Tag Archives | venture capitalist

How One Slide can Save Your Investor Pitch

As every entrepreneur knows, Venture Capitalists and Angel Investors and very busy people. Many have very short attention spans and pitch meetings can be very chaotic and unstructured. This can be a real problem when you are in the middle of an investor pitch, just about to get to the most compelling slide and either […]

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Create a Sense of Urgency When Pitching Investors

  Good investors are always spoilt for choice when it comes to deciding which startup to invest in. This is one of the primary factors that contributes to delay in getting the deal done. Other factors include due diligence, work overload, and sometimes power games. The longer a startup goes without cash the more desperate […]

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Create a Sense of Inevitability When You Pitch Investors

  About 15 years ago I was leading an investor pitch to the second in command of one of the world’s largest petroleum companies.  The pitch went well and at the end of the meeting the executive said something along the lines of ‘It’s clear to me that you’re a train that has left the […]

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How to craft a one liner Pitch

In today’s world of multiple communication channels and light speed transactions and decisions, the ability to pitch your startup in one sentence is critical.  This is all the more important when trying to get on the radar of a distracted Venture Capitalist. Unfortunately, most entrepreneurs are so immersed in the minutiae of their business, that […]

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Pre-Funding Tactics – The Art of Pitching Without Pitching

Don’t start to pitch Venture Capitalists until you’ve tested their likely level of interest in your startup.  This means making the effort and spending the time to build relationships with potential VC’s before you ask for money. And for those thinking that connecting with VC’s is ‘easier said than done’, sure it isn’t easy. But […]

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6 Ways to Build Trust with US-Based Investors

Today’s guest post is by Eyal Bino, Founder CEO of the World Wide Investor Network. If you are a founder of an innovative technology startup from outside the US, you know exactly what I’m talking about. The geographic distance, the difference in the business culture, the contacts (or lack of them), the cost, the time […]

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The Investor Pitch: Balancing Optimism and Risk

Optimism is a quality that is present in every successful entrepreneur. Without optimism, entrepreneurs would not take the huge risks they do, to bring their dreams to life. Without optimism, entrepreneurs would find it impossible to raise funding from Angel Investors and Venture Capitalists. it is optimism and iron clad self-belief that enables entrepreneurs to cope with frequent rejection […]

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Why Most Startups Shouldn’t Seek Investment

A client said to me last week that if I was so against startups raising capital from investors, why did I always blog and tweet about pitching investors. Fair point, made in response to my attempt to encourage him to bootstrap rather than pursue Angel Funding. The current bubbling market and spate of tech IPO’s […]

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A Further Shift in the Startup Universe

I originally posted a ‘Shift in the Startup Universe’ on January 1st 2011. Yesterdays announcement by The White House is indicative of further shifts in favor of the entrepreneur. The key role startups have in rebuilding the global economy is also being recognized by governments abroad (e.g. UK and Australia).   That recognition, where accompanied by concrete, meaningful steps to […]

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How to Demonstrate Traction in Your Investor Pitch (and Why You Need it)

The reason traction is so important to investors, is because it typically demonstrates a shift from an idea to something that is on the path to being a profit making business. Traction is progress or momentum. One Venture Capitalist described it to me as being as one ‘measurement of risk’. More traction can equal less risk.

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